Family Wellness

Because the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that parents put infants to sleep on their backs to prevent sudden infant death syndrome, the baby's bones can sometimes be molded and flattened over time, causing a child's head to become flat. (Thinkstock)

What you need to know about flat head syndrome

BY DR. STEVE KWON
With 1 in 68 children being diagnosed with autism, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's most recent study, and with some estimating that those rates are higher in Orange County, there's a significant need for resources that will help parents ensure that their children are as successful as possible when they head to high school or college or enter the workplace. (Thinkstock)

Social tips for kids on the spectrum

BY KELLY MCKINNON-BERMINGHAM
Always place your baby on her back to sleep. Babies on their backs are less likely to choke if they spit up. Studies also show that placing babies on their backs reduces SIDS and suffocation risk, as it allows infants to better regulate their breathing. (Thinkstock)

Keep your infant safe while sleeping

Updated guidelines for putting baby to bed
BY DR. ERIN FRANK